Center Yourself! Walk the Labyrinth!

Open to all. Located in the former “Whiteside Grocery” lot near 3rd and Crawford. 

Provided by First Presbyterian and First United Methodist Churches.

 

A prayer labyrinth is a single path to the center. There are no wrong turns or dead ends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Various designs have been used in nearly every human culture. As a Christian practice, it dates back to before the years 1200-1220AD, as this design was laid in stone in the floor of Chartres Cathedral in France during its construction. Right now our labyrinth is temporarily painted in, we are looking at options and interest to make it permanent.

 

There is no wrong way to walk a labyrinth. Some people like to start with a particular prayer or question. Some people like to read or recite scripture – one or more of the Psalms, for example. Children sometimes run or skip – what if we adults remembered that play is sacred? Pastor Christopher Eshelman often uses the labyrinth to wrestle with questions, ponder sermons, hold certain people or situations in prayer, or just to release anxieties. His favorite approach is to start with a particular focus, to breathe deeply at the entrance threshold and hold his hands out and make a releasing or emptying gesture. After walking a ways, he often feels prompted to bring his hands to a receiving gesture, often alternating between the two as he walks.  Normally one walks all the way into the center, pauses there for a time, and then walks it back out. But again – there is no wrong way to walk a labyrinth. For some it is a profound experience, for some just a walk. What will your journey bring? Just enter and stay on the path between the yellow lines to find out!

Disclaimer - please note - this labyrinth is an outdoor walking activity that may have uneven and rough surfaces and weather factors. Walkers assume all liability for falls or injuries. Stay hydrated and protected from the sun.

 

If you’d like more information or assistance with the labyrinth, contact Rev. Christopher Eshelman 

at First UMC (620) 223-1950 and leave a message. 

 

Blessings on your journey!